COVID-19 Salon/ Shop/ Suite Mobile Response

COVID-19 Salon/ Shop/ Suite 
 Mobile Response

Hey, I’m Denise I’m looking for a hairstylist who has experience in waves, weaves, and wigs.

Salon Owners, Barbershops, Hair Artist, Blow Dryer Bars, Massage Therapist, and Hair Braiders.

Timeline:

Throughout the next 3 days (3:30 pm CST), I’m going to be working with a handful of clients that are looking to create or update the copy on their website.

April 4, 2020

April 5, 2020

April 6, 2020

Interested

If you meet the following requirements please comment (including a website or Facebook Business Page)

Your Neo-Essential Business is one of the following:

  • Independent Contractor
  • Booth Renter 
  • Salon Owner
  • Hair braider as a Gig Worker wanting to increase your income by expanding your services. 

To complete some of these projects you MUST be:

  •  Dependable
  • -On-time with deadlines

In response to COVID-19, we will be discussing

  1. The CARE Act and what it means to the Beauty Industry
  • Who qualifies 
  • What are your options
  1. Accept clients on an appointment basis only!
  • Spacing your appointments out to reduce the number of people within the shop at a time. If you have more than one person in the shop then make sure there is good space between stations and that everyone working in the shop or space is following the same protocols. 
  • It’s IMPORTANT for you to implement a culture of safety in your business and for your brand. 
  • Learn how to use your phone calendar or a hand calendar to write appointments down 
  • Try a gig worker style of business for your premium customers where you travel to their home to do styles and cuts.
  1. BE SAFE with this and take all necessary precautions.  
  • Use NEW comfortable PPE’s when styling hair 
  • WASHING your Hands not just SHAMPOOING!
  •  Disinfect and power clean your shop
  • You and your clients should wear masks
  • Keep hand sanitizer or some cleanser around at all times when servicing your client
  • Communicate your new safety plans to your customers to help them feel safe and to keep them as customers.

Thank you!

Denise@BraidersCourse.com

Contact us for more information.

COVID-19 Salon/ Shop/ Suite Mobile Response

COVID-19 Salon/ Shop/ Suite 
 Mobile Response

Hey, I’m Denise I’m looking for a hairstylist who has experience in waves, weaves, and wigs.

Salon Owners, Barbershops, Hair Artist, Blow Dryer Bars, Massage Therapist, and Hair Braiders.

Timeline:

Throughout the next 3 days (3:30 pm CST), I’m going to be working with a handful of clients that are looking to create or update the copy on their website.

April 4, 2020

April 5, 2020

April 6, 2020

Interested

If you meet the following requirements please comment (including a website or Facebook Business Page)

Your Neo-Essential Business is one of the following:

  • Independent Contractor
  • Booth Renter 
  • Salon Owner
  • Hair braider as a Gig Worker wanting to increase your income by expanding your services. 

To complete some of these projects you MUST be:

  •  Dependable
  • -On-time with deadlines

In response to COVID-19, we will be discussing

  1. The CARE Act and what it means to the Beauty Industry
  • Who qualifies 
  • What are your options
  1. Accept clients on an appointment basis only!
  • Spacing your appointments out to reduce the number of people within the shop at a time. If you have more than one person in the shop then make sure there is good space between stations and that everyone working in the shop or space is following the same protocols. 
  • It’s IMPORTANT for you to implement a culture of safety in your business and for your brand. 
  • Learn how to use your phone calendar or a hand calendar to write appointments down 
  • Try a gig worker style of business for your premium customers where you travel to their home to do styles and cuts.
  1. BE SAFE with this and take all necessary precautions.  
  • Use NEW comfortable PPE’s when styling hair 
  • WASHING your Hands not just SHAMPOOING!
  •  Disinfect and power clean your shop
  • You and your clients should wear masks
  • Keep hand sanitizer or some cleanser around at all times when servicing your client
  • Communicate your new safety plans to your customers to help them feel safe and to keep them as customers.

Thank you!

Denise@BraidersCourse.com

Contact us for more information.

🧫 #Coronavirus Positive 💇🏽‍♀️#Beautician Spreads #COVID-19 to 40 Beauty Salon Clients

🧫 #Coronavirus Positive 💇🏽‍♀️#Beautician Spreads #COVID-19 to 40 Beauty Salon Clients

Coronavirus scare at Gold Coast beauty salon after beautician tests positive following trip to Iran

40 people who went to a Gold Coast salon and were treated by a beautician who has been diagnosed with coronavirus are being tracked down by the health departments.

She began to feel sick after returning to work in the Shopping center.

The Australian state’s chief health officer, Jeannette Young, said the woman did facial treatments on up to 40 clients, in sessions lasting less than 15 minutes.

Outbreak Workplace Measures.

Only 130 Beijing barbershops were allowed to open by Monday, February 30, 2019, only a tiny fraction of the more than 20,000 that usually operate across the city.

That’s .0065 percent four of the JF Pro Salon’s eight Beijing beauty businesses in the city.

Customers must maintain a distance of no less than 1.5 meters (5ft) between chairs.

You will have to make personal calls to EVERY customer who made reservations on the day of their appointment.

📳Ask if they have a cough or a fever, symptoms of pneumonia caused by the virus that causes 🦠Covid-19?

“Now we try to wash hair faster and cancel unnecessary services so as to cut down on the time with customers,” said Fu Jun, founder of JF Pro Salon.

“We keep the door open every day. Once the customers who made reservations arrive, we will 🧼disinfect their hands and 🚿shoe soles. These are the measures we take to ensure safety.”

40 percent of your employees/booth renters could work others should self-quarantine if they have a weakened immune system.

Sephora Cancels All Beauty Services And Makeovers

NPI

Nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) are public health actions that can slow the spread of emerging respiratory diseases like COVID-19 for which vaccines and drug treatments are not yet available.1  They include personal protective measures implemented by individuals and community measures implemented by affected communities.1   NPIs are used to build community preparedness in communities without known COVID-19 disease and to support outbreak responses in communities where local cases or clusters of diseases have occurred.

  • Personal Protective Measures. During an outbreak in your community, CDC recommends the everyday preventive measures listed above—especially 🤧staying home when sick—and taking these additional measures:
    • Keeping away from others who are sick.
    • Limiting face-to-face contact with others as much as possible
    • 👩‍⚕️Consulting with your healthcare provider if you or your household members are at high risk for COVID-19 complications
    • 😷Wearing a facemask if advised to do so by your healthcare provider or by a public health official
    • Staying home when a household member is sick with respiratory disease symptoms if instructed to do so by public health officials or a health care provider (Voluntary Home Quarantine)
  • Community Measures. If COVID-19 disease is occurring in your community, state and local public health authorities may decide to implement:
    • Temporary closures or dismissals of childcare facilities and schools
    • Other social distancing measures that increase the physical space between people, including:
      • Workplace social distancing measures, such as replacing in-person meetings with teleworking
      • Modifying, postponing, or canceling mass gatherings.

Decisions about the implementation of community measures will be made by local and state officials, in consultation with federal officials as appropriate, and based on the scope of the outbreak and the severity of illness.  Implementation will require extensive community engagement and ongoing and transparent public health communications.

Beautician With COVID-19

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australia/coronavirus-scare-at-gold-coast-beauty-salon-after-beautician-tests-positive-following-trip-to-iran/ar-BB10xfBF

Sephora

https://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/entry/sephora-cancels-makeup-service-coronavirus_au_5e3bc05ec5b6bb0ffc0b297b

Coronavirus: China’s Hair Salon

https://www.scmp.com/lifestyle/fashion-beauty/article/3052672/coronavirus-chinas-hair-salons-and-barbershops-suffering

NPI-CDC

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/preparing-individuals-communities.html

#2020 is here! Are you a Weaveologist or Cosmetologist doing sew-in weaves?

Are you a Cosmetologist or Weaveologist?

Weaveologist install front lace weaves, frontals and sew- ins on customers as a professional hair artist.

“Hair braiding” as defined includes more than just cornrows — it also includes “locking, sewing, twisting, weaving, or wrapping” hair and extensions by hand and by only using simple braiding devices.

Those “simple hair devices” include needles under Minnesota Statute 116.76.

These needles are used for installing “scalp hair prostheses” as defined in Minnesota Statutes 62A.28, commonly known as “customized wigs” as included in the Hair Braiding definition, as well as for sew-in weaves.

This is scary as most Black women in braiding salons re-use weaving needles and do not use safety equipment in hair braiding salons and we are the highest rate of HIV, HCV, and HPV contacting in Minnesota.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that about 385,000 sharps-related injuries occur annually among health care workers in hospitals.

While there is no data for exposure to injuries by the Board of Cosmetology or the MN Health Department, the CDC reports that such simple device injuries pose a 24 percent increased risk with suture needles.

As a licensed cosmetologist and hair braider course provider, I helped form the EcoHair Braiders Association, LLC in 2014 along with five hair braider course providers to provide an online learning natural hair course and learning experience for hair braiders.

Currently, there are 350 registered hair braiders 156 active, 17-course providers, 2 charter schools and four community colleges offering the hair braiding services and curriculum, “Natural Hair Braiding Safety for the Public and Practitioner.”

As hair braiders, individuals and entities, we authorized, reviewed, and approved the adoption of the rules by the Board of Cosmetology into Chapter 154 and 155A and are now asking Minnesota’s legislators to amend HF 140 to include informative safety oversight research and analysis that will create uniformity and allow reciprocation between 24 other states that currently regulate hair braiding and fiscal note for appropriations.

We also request the creation of a Needle-Stick Committee to help reduce exposure to bloodborne pathogens by establishing preventive rules for the safety of the citizens of the state.

We do not want the current hair braiding law repealed, we just want it transferred to another chapter in the Minnesota Statutes to address infection control. In addition to needles, “hair braiders” use glue, cigarette lighters and boiling hot water which could also create health risks. 

We recommend this infection control training be regulated and include three parts: bloodborne pathogen compliance via OSHA and its Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act of 2000; first-aid training from Red Cross; and personal protective equipment training from the Department of Labor and industry to include the use of thimbles and containers. This training could be completed in as few as three hours, but needs to happen annually.

We understand Moran’s desire to remove cumbersome requirements as it relates to the economy, but ultimately see it posing a greater risk for the health of Black women which is our greatest form of wealth.

Denise Jarrett a licensed cosmetologist, manager, instructor, school manager, hair braider course providers, and expert witness.

Hair Braiding is REPEAL!

Minnesota has REPEALED hair braiding from the Board of Cosmetologist and hair Braiders will no longer have the options of being licensed to do natural hair.

The deregulation of natural hair care to just hair braiding and not considering the many women who preform natural hair styles, weaves and wigs. Hair Braiding REPEALED

Hair Braider Registration REPEALED

It’s ALL back on the hands of the cosmetology board. Look 👀 for many shops to close and have more fines from the board.

Use IG GLUE and NEEDLES are a No No for now!

Please stay tuned as O will update my sisters on this matter.

And don’t hesitate to call, text or email 📧 if the Boards starts to retaliate.

I’ll keep watching as Rena Moran stated when asked about sanitation and health risks associated with hair styling, Moran said education shouldn’t be a prohibitive factor for licensure, noting it should be common practice. “It’s just a healthy thing to do to wash a comb before you use it on another person’s head or take note of a scalp issue. But that’s more of an educational piece that needs to take place,” she added. “There are ways to work with the [MN] Department of Health to get those basic type of safety criteria in place.”

Let’s see if the Hair Braider Registration will have to report to the Health Departments and does Rena really care about BlackWomens health.

Unleashing a Needle and Removing ‘hair braiding license’ requirements puts Black women at risk

I recently read the article “Hair braiding bill represents ‘new narrative’ at legislature” and Rep. Rena Moran’s move to eliminate hair braiding license requirements. I strongly disagree. She thinks she’s helping us, but she’s not. Removing the education piece will only place Black women at even higher health risks.

Hair braiding” as defined in HF Chapter 155A includes more than just cornrows — it also includes “locking, sewing, twisting, weaving, or wrapping” hair and extensions by hand and by only using simple braiding devices. Those “simple hair devices” include needles under Minnesota Statute 116.76.

These needles are used for installing “scalp hair prostheses” as defined in Minnesota Statutes 62A.28, commonly known as “customized wigs” as included in the Hair Braiding definition, as well as for sew-in weaves.

This is scary as most Black women in braiding salons re-use weaving needles and do not use safety equipment in hair braiding salons and we are the highest rate of HIV, HPV and HPV contacting in Minnesota.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that about 385,000 sharps-related injuries occur annually among health care workers in hospitals. While there is no data for exposure to injuries by the Board of Cosmetology or the MN Health Department, the CDC reports that such simple device injuries pose a 24 percent increased risk with suture needles.

As a licensed cosmetologist and hair braider course provider, I helped form the EcoHair Braiders Association, LLC in 2014 along with five hair braider course providers to provide an online learning natural hair course and learning experience for hair braiders. Currently, there are 350 registered hair braiders 156 active, 17-course providers, 2 charter schools and four community colleges offering the hair braiding services and curriculum, “Natural Hair Braiding Safety for the Public and Practitioner.”

As hair braiders, individuals and entities, we authorized, reviewed, and approved the adoption of the rules by the Board of Cosmetology into Chapter 154 and 155A and are now asking Minnesota’s legislators to amend SF 2227 to include informative safety oversight research and analysis that will create uniformity and allow reciprocation between 24 other states that currently regulate hair braiding and fiscal note for appropriations.

We also request the creation of a Needle-Stick Committee to help reduce exposure to bloodborne pathogens by establishing preventive rules for the safety of the citizens of the state.

We do not want the current hair braiding law repealed, we just want it transferred to another chapter in the Minnesota Statutes to address infection control. In addition to needles, “hair braiders” use glue, cigarette lighters and boiling hot water which could also create health risks. 

We recommend this infection control training be regulated and include three parts: bloodborne pathogen compliance via OSHA and its Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act of 2000; first-aid training from Red Cross; and personal protective equipment training from the Department of Labor and industry to include the use of thimbles and containers. This training could be completed in as few as three hours, but needs to happen annually.

We understand Moran’s desire to remove cumbersome requirements as it relates to the economy, but ultimately see it posing a greater risk for the health of Black women which is our greatest form of wealth.

Contact Gov. Tim Walz with your concerns and read the full article on Minnesota Spokesmen-Recorder.

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